Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’ -- Weeping Giant Sequoia

Common Name

Weeping Giant Redwood

Origin

Nursery

Family

Sequoioideae

Type

Evergreen conifer tree

ID Features

Twisted leader with long, weeping branches & apron/skirt at base of tree (unless pruned). Needle-like leaves are angular, awl-like, prickly. Blue-green color. Thick, red-brown bark. Bigger cones (2 – 3”) held at branch ends

Size

Mature: 60– 100’ H, 20 – 25’ S (Nobody knows how big it will get ultimately, because it lives for 1000 years & it’s only been around for 60 – 70 years.)

Landscape: 16 – 28’ H, 12 – 14’ S

Growth rate: Fast (3 – 6‘ per year)

Form

Twisted leader with long, weeping branches & apron/skirt at base of tree (unless pruned)

Bark & Branches

Red-brown bark (not as red as Sequoia sempervirens); thick (insect & fire-resistant)

bark photo
Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’ bark

Foliage

All needle-like growth—angular & awl-like, 1⁄4 - 1⁄2” long (shorter than Sequoia sempervirens) Very prickly—can cause rashes Color: blue green (overall color of ‘Pendulum’ is darker because of the way the needles lay)

foliage photo
Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’ foliage

Buds

Subtle or small male polen cones (may be missing).

buds photo
Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’ buds

Cones

Held at branch ends Oval, red-brown, 2 – 3” (larger than Sequoia sempervirens)

cones photo
Sequoiadendron giganteum ‘Pendulum’ cones

Cultural considerations

Hardiness

Sunset: (A1), A2, 1 – 9, 14 – 23 (more cold-hardy than Sequoia sempervirens)

USDA: 3 – 8

Exposure

Full sun

Soil

Deep, well-drained soil. Plant on a berm in heavier soil

Water

Infrequent, deep irrigation

Pests

--

Diseases / Problems

Can be subject to fungal diseases outside native habitat. Soil compaction will harm trees—lots of visitors to parks have compacted soil & damaged trees; the park has put a fence around the trees to protect them

Pruning

Remove dead/damaged wood

Propagation

Semi-hardwood cuttings—difficult

Use

Large specimen conifer used for odd growth form—needs large area or it will overwhelm spacein 15 years

Other

More successful in colder, inland climates than in coastal climates. Very deep roots (tap root)—do not buy plants > 6 feet; best to start small. Suffer with pollution. Usually find 10-foot trees, but best to start small. Seems to be ok with wind—no branches lost from campus trees exposed to high winds

Links

OSU -- Wikipedia

Credits

Photos taken by Jeff Kidder on the PCC Rock Creek campus, unless noted to the contrary.

Much of the text in the plant info was taken from handouts in the Evergreen Plant ID course.