Cedrus deodara ‘Aurea’ -- Golden Deodar Cedar

Etymology

Cultivar

Common Name

Golden Deodar Cedar

Origin

Nursery

Family

Pinaceae

Type

Evergreen conifer tree

ID Features

Golden yellow tips Smaller size 2 leaf arrangements: single at tips & 20+ needles on spur shoots farther back on branch More open & airy vs. Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca’ Worm-like cones Nodding tip

Size

Mature: 75 – 80’ H, 50 – 60’ S

Landscape: 18 – 22’ H, 18 – 22’ S (smaller than species)

Growth rate: Moderate to fast

Form

Young: broad pyramid with long sweeping branches & weeping top Older (> 80 years): broad, flat-topped vase

habit photo
Cedrus deodara ‘Aurea’ habit

Bark & Branches

Similar to Cedrus deodara New twigs: silver gray Main trunk: plated, dark gray

Foliage

Younger needles arranged radially on branch tips Older needles (> 20 needles per cluster) on spur shoots farther back on branch; spurs are farther apart vs. Cedrus atlantica & create more open effect Needles soft, long (11⁄2 - 21⁄2” long) Color: last 2 – 3” of branches are bright, golden yellow—color is often brightest on southern side of tree & in spring when the tree gets more sun; dark sea green (needles farther back on branch)

foliage photo
Cedrus deodara ‘Aurea’ foliage

Cones

Male: heavy cone set (2 1⁄2 - 4” long); trees set 100s of cones some years; cones resemble large worms Female: tan to brown cones (3” long, 2 1⁄2 wide at base); cones shatter when ripe, leaving a central spike on branch; tree forms cones > 12 – 15 years old

cones photo
Cedrus deodara ‘Aurea’ cones

Cultural considerations

Hardiness

Sunset: 3b – 10, 14 – 24

USDA: 6 – 8

Exposure

Full sun (color is better with more sun)

Soil

Not fussy—but needs good drainage

Water

With or without irrigation

Pests

--

Diseases / Problems

Wood is brittle & breaks easily in storms Foliage burns in cold (east) winds Highly susceptible to 2-4D products (herbicide) that can cause total defoliation

Pruning

Remove dead/damaged wood Head up, if desired. Control spread of tree by cutting new growth of side branches halfway back in spring; this will also make tree denser

Propagation

Grafted—doesn’t come true from seed

Use

Large specimen conifer for large areas, parks; used as stock plant for grafted cultivars

Other

Deep-rooted Old specimen in Portland on Taylor’s Ferry Road near main administration building at Lewis & Clark College

Links

OSU -- Wikipedia

Credits

Photos taken by Jeff Kidder on the PCC Rock Creek campus, unless noted to the contrary.

Much of the text in the plant info was taken from handouts in the Evergreen Plant ID course.